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Friday, July 21, 2017

How To Do Sutures


Below are two great YouTube videos that show two different ways of suturing up a wound.





Looks pretty simple to me. You can probably find some foam type fabric to practice these techniques on.

~Urban Man~

Sunday, July 16, 2017

4 Ways To Make An Ionized Radiation Detector



As ISIS continues to move into Europe and Asiatic countries, they will gain access to materials that emit ionizing radiation. Aging nuclear power plants, aging missiles, and radioactive dumps all pose a threat to our health and well being without even being in the hands of an enemy nation or terrorist group.

That's why you need a reliable means to detect nuclear radiation on a routine basis, and you can even build yourself such a device, as an alternative to store bough Geiger counters.

Here's what you need to know about different ways to build an ionizing radiation detector and how much it will cost to operate and maintain the equipment.

Radiation Types - The Difference Really Counts

Ionizing radiation comes in 5 basic forms. For the sake of simplicity, it is easiest to rate them by what they can and cannot pass through. Ideally, you should be able to detect at least alpha and gamma rays, as they span the range of particles you would need to be most concerned about as someone trying to survive a nuclear event.

Alpha

Alpha carries the least amount of energy. It can be stopped by a sheet of paper. These particles are still very dangerous if swallowed or inhaled. Even alpha particles are the easiest to stop, they are also some of the hardest forms of ionizing radiation to detect. Typically, it will take a conventional Geiger counter to detect alpha particles. There are some DIY explorers that claim they are able to detect this form of radiation with modified photo diodes and transistors.

Beta

These particles carry more energy than Alpha particles. They can be stopped by aluminum foil, thin boards of wood, and other fairly lightweight material. Beta particles can also be very dangerous if swallowed or inhaled.                                     

You are more than likely familiar with these particles because they are routinely used in medical imaging studies. As with other forms of ionizing radiation, they are derived from unstable atoms that break apart and release rays of energy. X-rays cannot penetrate bone or thicker metal plates.

Typically, even the thickness of most metal pendants is enough to stop X-rays from passing through. Some talcum powders and other body powders can also stop a good percentage of X-rays from passing into the body.

Gamma

Of all the radiation types that can be released by a nuclear power plant, a nuclear bomb, or from nuclear waste, gamma rays are the most dangerous. They carry a good bit of power and can only be stopped by lead, iron, or other metal shields. Gamma rays can be detected readily enough by photo diodes and other alternative ionizing radiation detectors.

Worst comes to worst, this is the form of radiation you should be most concerned with detecting. If you know there is gamma radiation present, and can track the changes in the amount, then you can estimate when beta and alpha particles will also be gone.

Neutrons

Since this is one of the three main parts of an atom, it is also one of the most dangerous because other atoms can absorb it and become unstable.  Once the host atom becomes unstable, it can also release radiation, or become “radioactive”.  Neutrons can only be stopped by large amounts of water, concrete, or other substances that contain a large amount of hydrogen.

Bear in mind, however, these substances will also become unstable and release radiation to some extent. Overall, it is not easy to detect neutrons. Fortunately, relatively few are released from an atomic explosion when compared to other particles.
                                          


Pros and Cons of Making a Conventional Geiger Counter

Modern electronics has made a lot of advances in terms of changing from vacuum tube based technologies to solid state devices. Some forms of ionizing radiation still require a vacuum tube and high voltages.

While a Geiger counter is still the most reliable device for detecting the widest range of radiation types, it can be very expensive to make.

The vacuum tube can be damaged by incorrect voltages, or need to be replaced for other reasons. Since this is also the most expensive part of the detector, it is fairly easy to see why most people don't try to build, let alone maintain a conventional Geiger counter for use on a routine basis. 

How to Use Arduino or Cell Phone to Make a Geiger Counter

Building a Geiger counter with Arduino isn't so different from building anything else. You will need to start with a main board and then add the appropriate sensors and output devices. With Arduino you have the choice of using a gas tube like a regular geiger counter, or you can use a solid state version.

Build the tube version (choose a dosimeter/geiger counter kit that has the LCD shield and tube bundled with it) and keep it on hand for situations where you suspect there is a need for detecting all particles emitted by a nuclear event. You may also be able to use conventional tubes that weren't originally designed for use with an Arduino board. Just make sure that you know their voltage requirements and how to test if they actually work.

There are many tubes available from different countries. As a result, you will need to do some research on each tube and learn from people in forums dedicated to building various kinds of Geiger counters.

You can also build the version that relies on a solid state sensor. This one is sturdier and uses less power. You can simply set up nuclear watch stations that report around the clock.  I would also recommend adding an additional board to the Arduino main board that will accommodate a memory chip.

This will enable you record sampling data around the clock so that you can upload it to your computer and compare it over time. As you learn what the normal radiation levels are in your area, you can always set the sensor to beep or give some other type of alarm when the levels are too high.

You can also try adding an wireless remote system or even one that will report directly to your smart phone. If you live near a nuclear power plant, or any other area that houses any kind of radioactive material, it is very important to have these kinds of records so that you have a better sense of what is going on around you.

For an even simpler and cheaper option, you can purchase a solid state radiation sensor that will plug into the sound jack on your cell phone. As with Geiger counter tubes, there are a few different models available. Take some time to study the apps that control them so that you can find one that meets your sampling and data recording needs.



Kearny Fallout Meters

Of all the ways to detect radiation, the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) is one of the cheapest and simplest. If you don't know how to maintain the meter, it can produce some unreliable results.  In order to make this meter, you only need some tin foil, a tin can, some paper, charging wires, and a means to give a static charge to the foil leaves. Make a Gamma Radiation Detector Using a Photo Diode

Making a radiation detector using a photo diode will cost about the same as using an Arduino kit. The advantage to building it using this method is you will have complete control of all the parts. Once you have the main elements figured out, you can also look for ways to convert from solid state parts to ones that will better withstand an EMP.



The Tin Can Ion Chamber Radiation Detector 

If you choose a sensor to add to your cell phone, it will only cost around $30.00, while a good Arduino system may cost as much as $150.00. Building  your own conventional Geiger counter could cost several hundred dollars by the time you purchase the tube, build the power supply and other supporting parts.

There are some down and dirty ways to build a radiation detector for under $10.00 with items from around your house. While there are several videos and DIY forms that claim these radiation detectors work, it may be hard to test that out and get viable answer.



Unlike the Kearny Fallout Meter that has a long history of validation, other forms of tin can radiation detectors may or may not work as described.
If you are on a tight budget and want something to start with, here are the basic steps.

To start off, you will need a metal can (soda cans work well) with an interior that conducts electricity; some tin foil, a 4.7K ohm resistor, some wire, a 9 volt battery and attachment clip, a multi-meter, and an NPN  transistor. 

You can also use any transistor that is over 1.0 K ohm. If you are scavenging for parts, or included them in your bug out gear, variable resistors may also be good to start with. Since this meter is highly susceptible to false readings caused by electromagnetic fields (even if you move around or change body position, the meter numbers will change), you may be find a different resistor setting works for different occasions. 

There are two main kinds of solid state transistors; PNP  and NPN. If you scavenged a transistor, it is very important to make sure you have the right kind, and also that it is still in good working order. You can use the ohm setting on your multi-meter to achieve both goals. 

Once you are certain that you have a suitable transistor, you can begin assembling the radiation detector. Make sure the top of the can is open. 

Next, drill a hole in the center of the bottom of the can. Pull the leads of the transistor apart so that they do not touch each other. Solder some wire onto the collector and emitter leads. Make sure that the wires never touch each other or the can.  Transistors can be shorted out very easily if the leads cross or anything that extends from them. 

Solder bare wire to the base lead of the transistor and then stick it through the hole that you drilled in the bottom of the can. The bare wire should reach to the opening of the can, but not touch the tin foil. The wire for the transistor emitter connects to the negative lead for the battery tester. 

The collector lead should be connected to the negative lead for the battery. Take one side of the diode and solder it to the outside of the can. 

The other side of the diode connects to the positive lead on the multi-meter and the positive side of the battery. In order to reduce stray electromagnetic impulses from impacting the sensor, you will need to cover the open part of the can with tin foil.

To operate the meter, attach a 9 volt battery to the adapter and turn on the multi-meter. Start off with the highest voltage setting so that you don't inadvertently short out the meter. 

Later on, once you know the circuit works, you can use a lower setting so that you get a more accurate reading.

To test the meter, you can try purchasing radioactive rocks. Just make sure you know how to store them properly so that you do not inadvertently wind up with radiation poisoning.

There are also a number of kits available that have limited amounts of radioactive material in them. If there is gamma radiation present, the meter will show a much higher reading than it will for electromagnetic interference or background radiation.

As with any other DIY project, you will need to experiment with different materials so that you are accustomed to seeing what sets the meter off and whether or not you need to be concerned about it.

In these challenging times, there are many ways and places where you and your loved ones may come into contact with ionized radiation. 

If you want to limit your exposure, know when to bug out, or even know whether the area is contaminated, being able to test for radiation is very important.

While you may not be able to afford a conventional Geiger counter, there are several less expensive alternatives. This includes making your own Kearny Fallout Meter, as well as an ion detection chamber.

As you improve your skills with building electronic devices, you can try building a detector that uses a photo diode as the main sensor, or better yet, a detector that uses an Arduino board and compatible output devices.

Regardless of the method you choose to start with, it is very important to test each device out and practice with it as often as possible. 

This will make it much easier to be confident of your findings in both nuclear emergencies and situations where the truth about increased ion radiation levels in your area is being hidden from you.

[This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia. ]

~Urban Man~


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Measure Distance Using Compass





Your compass is a measuring tool that can be adapted to a variety of needs. As shown here, it can be used to measure more than just direction.

You can use your magnetic compass to determine the width of a stream or small body of water without having to get wet. This quick and easy method of determining distance using a compass may just come in handy. In any case, it is always a good trick you can use to amaze your fellow survivors.

Here is how it is done.

1. Standing at the edge of the water, sight an object directly across from you on the far bank. Take a compass reading on this object and mark the spot where you are standing.

2. Walk along the stream until the compass reading to the same object across the stream changes by 45-degrees and mark this spot also.

3. Now measure the distance between the two marks you set. This will be equal to the distance between the first mark and the object you sighted across the stream.

For example:

Say you are standing next to a stream and directly across from you on the opposite bank is a large tree. Take out your compass and sight the tree. 

Let’s pretend the compass reads 300-degrees (Azimuth type compass) or S30W (Quadrant type compass). Mark this spot and then walk either downstream or upstream until the compass sighting on the same tree reads 45-degrees in either direction from your first reading (either 255-degrees or 345-degrees on an azimuth type compass, S15E or N15W on a quadrant type compass). 

Mark this position also. The width of the stream is equal to the distance between your two marks on the ground. If you have practiced pacing (and every survivor should) you can count the number of paces between the two marks and calculate the width of the stream.

The best survivalists are skilled in using whatever materials at hand in novel ways that give him an edge over his environment. "Thinking out of the box" is a trademark of the true survivor.

~Urban Man~

Monday, May 1, 2017

Reloading and Other Unique Survival Skills



Urban Survival Skills received this question from BlackHat16: "I want your opinion on reloading equipment. I want to buy, maybe spread out due to the cost, a reloading setup in case shit hits the fan I can reload ammunition as I believe it will be hard to come by. What versions of reloading equipment would you recommend and any other recommendations on equipment would be appreciated."

Mr BlackHat16, I would have to ask several questions before I get into reloading presses and ancillary equipment. Have you any experience in reloading? Do you plan on stocking reloading supplies, such as powder, primers and bullets? In a SHTF scenario, I would think that reloading supplies such as primers, powders and bullets would be as or more scarce than ammunition.

I think having reloading equipment and more important, the experience in reloading would be a good survival skill, in fact a mandatory skills, but much lower in priority that say, wilderness survival skills, farming and canning skills and others, simply because of the requirement of having the components - powder, primers and bullets, not to mention empty cases (brass). However, if all other survival material and equipment needs are met, having some reloading equipment would be a good idea.

Lyman hand press, single stage press, rotary (aka Progressive) presses could provide a capability, again given the components, to produce good quality ammunition, given the skill, and/or be a barter item in the coming crunch. If pushed, you could make a usable powder, re-manufacture spent primers and cast bullets, but you need some equipment, material and skill to do so.

I am NOT trying to dash your thoughts of getting reloading equipment just know that it can be overwhelming for a novice re-loader and most preppers may be better served using the required money to invest in ammunition, firearms or other higher priority survival equipment and items. All reloading presses or tools requires dies for that cartridge. Please go to YouTube and research reloading - plenty of people willing to help there.

A hand tool, such as the Lyman 310 hand-tool, is like a pliers type of re-loader and the cheapest route you can go. See the picture. You need the Lyman 310 and a set of dies for whatever caliber/cartridge you want to reload. The benefit in this method is the small, portable package. Go to Lyman Products to see their Lyman 310 and other reloading equipment.





http://www.lymanproducts.com/index.php/

A single stage reloading press like the RCBS Rock Chucker is a quality piece of equipment, not so portable!, but user friendly, just requires the changing out of dies for each step in the reloading process, so it's slow. See one of the RCBS single stage presses in the picture.


Going to the RCBS website and look at their equipment and kits is a good idea.

http://rcbs.com/Products/Presses-and-Kits.aspx



Likely the best reloading products come from Dillion Precision. Mike Dillon, the founder, just passed away this past November, but he left a legacy that won't be beat anytime soon. He revolutionized the reloading industry with his dynamic progressive presses which is about as automatic of a reloading setup as you can get. You can go to their website, but don't leave without requesting their Blue Press Catalog.

https://www.dillonprecision.com/




One overall good distributor of reloading equipment would be MidWay. They offer a lot of products and have good prices and service. Go to their site here:

https://www.midwayusa.com/

Again reloading skills are good to have you can go to Sword of Survival and these videos to check out survival type reloading skills. Here are a couple links for survival ammo reloading:

http://www.swordofsurvival.com/2016/06/field-kit-for-expedient-reloading-of.html
http://www.swordofsurvival.com/2016/06/reload-209-primers-using-field.html
http://www.swordofsurvival.com/2016/06/field-expedient-ammo-reloading.html

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Is George Orwell's 1984 Coming True?


" Here is a good article I just read. Its getting to get real...."

Urban Man-


In February 1937, an idealistic and ungainly Englishman in his thirties traveled to Spain to take his place in the trenches at the Aragón front to defend the Republic. His name was Eric Arthur Blair, remembered by history as George Orwell. This month, 80 years after the start of that adventure, Richard Blair, the writer’s only son, now a 72-year-old retired agricultural engineer, visited Huesca to take part in the opening of a major exhibition about his father.

Talking to EL PAÍS during his brief stopover in Madrid on his way back to London, Blair evoked the figure of Orwell and commented on the relevance of his legacy and the enormous interest in his final novel, 1984, which has become an international best-seller since Donald Trump became US president.

“It’s true that in recent weeks, with the references in the United States to ‘alternative facts’ [cited by Kellyanne Conway, one of the president’s top advisors], there has been increased interest in his book. But my father has never gone out of fashion.” The book was not so much a prophecy as a fable about Nazi and Stalinist totalitarianism, says Blair, although as he points out, some details from the novel that once seemed like science fiction have been part of our everyday life for some time, such as security cameras that watch our movements, or what some companies know about us from our internet activity, or how we use our credit cards. “Society has evolved toward what he saw. The world is becoming Orwellian,” he says.

Blair is patron of the Orwell society, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to spreading knowledge about the life and work of the writer, as well as debate about ideas, and that remains scrupulously neutral about politics. Which might explain why he is so careful in choosing his words when talking about Trump.

“I think that there is a lot of tension and compression in the White House right now. It is true that Trump is attacking the press, but he is a complete enigma, they are all maneuvering and learning to live with each other,” he says.

Nevertheless, he says he cannot help but be happy at the hike in sales of his father’s books, particularly as he inherited the publishing rights (“which expire in 2020,” he points out). But he recognizes concerns that this has been due to the public finding parallels between the current situation and the dystopia Orwell described.

Orwell and his wife Eileen adopted Richard in 1944. Ten months later, Eileen died on the operating table. Some of the friends of the tuberculous-stricken writer suggested that he give up custody of the child but he ruled out the possibility. The relationship between Orwell and his adopted son became closer when the two of them moved to the Scottish island of Jura, chosen because it was a healthier location for Orwell to overcome his illness and where it was so cold that “if you move six feet away from the fireplace, you freeze.”

Blair’s memories from those days are of a loving father who made wooden toys, who had a strange sense of humor, and whose parenting style had none of the political correctness of modern upbringings. On one occasion he allowed the three-year-old Richard to smoke from a pipe filled with tobacco collected from his cigarette butts. The result, aside from a vomiting fit, was that the child saw himself temporarily vaccinated against the vice of smoking.

It was on Jura that Orwell finished 1984, writing in his room during the day and spending the evenings with the child. One of their favorite activities was fishing, especially for the lobsters that filled out a diet otherwise made frugal by post-war rationing. One weekend in August 1947, however, on a journey back from a weekend of relaxation on the west side of Jura, their boat sank and they almost drowned. Blair says Orwell’s health suffered as a result. David Astor, owner of The Observer newspaper, which published the writer’s work, asked to be allowed import the newly discovered antibiotic streptomycin from the United States, with which he was treated between December 1947 and July 1948 in a hospital near Glasgow. But his efforts were in vain: Orwell developed an allergy to the medication. “His nails fell out and blisters appeared on his lips,” Richard recalls. The writer died in January 1950 at age of 46, when his son was about to celebrate his sixth birthday.

What is the most important lesson that Orwell taught us? For journalists, says Blair, there are many. “To be honest. The most important things are facts which can be corroborated, not reality as you want it to be. Journalists today do not have time to check facts, and errors are perpetuated and multiplied on the internet until they become true.” The writer’s son also recalls Orwell’s six rules for clear writing from his 1946 essay Politics and the English Language. “Never use a metaphor, simile or other figure of speech that you are used to seeing in print; Never use a long word where a short one will do; If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out; Never use the passive where you can use the active; Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent; Break any of these rules sooner than say anything barbarous.”

Blair finished up with his father’s definition of liberty: “If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

Blair is particularly concerned about the lack of dialogue in contemporary society. “All people do is shout at one another, without actually listening.” And he is surprised to see young people who, instead of speaking face to face, spend all day staring into their smartphones. “Even couples in restaurants! Are they communicating with each other via text messages?!” he jokes. And what would Orwell make of the 21st century, the era of the internet, great scientific advances and post-truth?

“Ah, now that’s the million-dollar question. But it’s impossible to get into anyone’s head. Nor to come up with the answer by reading his books. If he were still alive he would be 113, and would have had a lot of new influences… There’s no point in speculating.” As such, we don’t know, and we can’t know. But he does go as far as to assume one thing: whatever his thoughts, they would be characterized by common sense.

This article was first posted on El Pais
http://elpais.com/elpais/2017/02/21/inenglish/1487677236_774641.html

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Dripping Survivalism to Neophytes



I was talking to a friend of mine this past weekend. He knows generally that I am a prepper but he does not know to what extent. He (we'll call him Bill) said that prior to the Presidential election he was concerned about the country falling in anarchy. So much in fact that he bought a gun. Bill told me he had inherited a 12 gauge "bird hunting' shotgun from his father, but never had plans to buy another gun until he got 'scared' - for his family and himself. So he went out and bought as Glock 9mm handgun. He didn't even know what model number.

Bill is some sort of a financial planner, trust funds or something, I really don't remember and could not give a shit less, but I could not pass up the opportunity to educate him and used that angle to get him thinking:

UrbanMan: Well Bill, having a gun, several guns in fact, are a good idea for protection especially when the security situation becomes worse, but you need training and well as have some ammunition stocked up for the time when it gets scarce. Ammunition, as well as food, batteries, water, etc., will be the first to fly off the shelves - and before it flies off the shelves the price will raise dramatically.

Bill: I guess you are right. I have a box of 50 bullets for the Glock.

UrbanMan: Bill, if I were you I would buy another 150 or 200 rounds of ammunition and continue to buy at least a box a month until he have 1,000 rounds minimum. Plus you need to have some 12 gauge bird shot and buck shot, as well as some slug shotgun shells also.

Bill: That's a lot of ammo! Do you really think I need that much? Although you are right about the shotgun. I don't have any ammunition for that.

UrbanMan: Yes, you need plenty of ammunition. You don't want to wait until you need it. At that point it will be expensive, maybe very hard to find and you will expose your safety going to gun shops trying to find it. Go buy two boxes of bird shot, which would be 50 shot shells, five boxes of 00 buckshot (total of 25 rounds) and two boxes of one ounce slugs (10 rounds). Buy a couple boxes of each, every month until you have two to three hundred of each load. Get an old Army metal ammunition can and keep it in your closet. It won't take up much room and it'll give you peace of mind.

Bill: I don;t know. That's a lot of money.

UrbanMan: Jesus Bill, you make a lot of money, so stop buying beer or ice cream or movie tickets of whatever else you don't need every week and invest in your survival insurance. Also what are you going to do if the banks close or the dollar tanks or the ATM stops working or the government says you can only withdraw $100 a day and food prices go up 1000%.

Bill: Well, I think we'll have more problems than money if that happens.

UrbanMan: That's right, hence the guns. And the food you have stocked up in your pantry and garage. And the safe place you have a plan to get to rather than staying in the suburbs.

Bill: I am really uncomfortable planning on the world to collapse.

UrbanMan: Uncomfortable? How about not being able to protect or feed your family? That in my book would be a lot more uncomfortable. All I am suggesting is a modicum of planning and preparation. You deal in the financial world. Is diversification of investments generally a good thing?

Bill: Generally, it is. You don't want to have all your assets in one area, say stock funds.

UrbanMan: Well, consider a little prepping as diversification of your survival portfolio. Do you track the precious metals exchange?

Bill: Yes, I have clients who own gold and silver stocks. And come to think of it, I do field questions from existing clients on adding that to their portfolios. I really don;t recommend too much resources devoted to that investment.

UrbanMan: You are talking about 'paper' gold and silver, which will do you no good if everything collapses. You should think about buying at least some silver each month and put it away as a hedge if the dollar collapse or hyper inflation hits. Silver is about $16.75 an ounce right now, but if you research it, you'll see that U.S. silver production is declining significantly over the past couple of months and expected to decline further. So solely as an investment I'll think you see silver increasingly around $3 to $5 an ounce within the next three months. Just a few months ago it was around $21 an ounce and remember it wasn't too long ago when silver hit $48 an ounce.

Bill: You may be right, but the precious metals market changes from time to time under forces we never fully understand,...everything from price manipulation to large purchases by various countries.

UrbanMan: Exactly. That's why you need to protect yourself. I am not advocating an 180 degree change in your financial planning or monthly spending. I am just talking about small changes, re-directional really, that plug holes in your ability to survive.

Bill: Okay. Well I'll think about it.

UrbanMan: Ok, you think about it. In the meantime, I'm going to send you some website and recommended reading. Don't be the dumb ass left out.

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Benefits of Honey



Recently I had a cancerous tumor removed from one of my dogs. It was on surface of the ear and it left a nasty wound. I was surprised when the Vet had me change the dressing every day with a non-stick pad coated with all natural honey. My Vet said it would heal the wound as good or better than anything they could give me.

So I was interested when I saw this article from HealthMixer on the "35 Amazing Benefits of All-Natural Honey". I hope you will too. Oh, by the way, my Dog's wound healed quickly and nicely!

Honey offers a wide range of trace minerals that are necessary for the body’s proper functioning. It is an anti-bacterial that can help with constipation and calcium absorption. When one endeavors to study the benefits of honey, it is completely believable that a list surpassing 75 elements can be achieved. We chose to narrow that list down to include the 35 benefits we found most amazing. And, we can’t wait for you to read # 25!

Honey is nature’s best kept medicine. Your ancestors probably found more value in it than you have ever even considered. But that’s ok, because we’re here to bring all that back! Check out these amazing benefits:

#1 Cough & Sore Throat. Honey is a phenomenal cough suppressant. In fact, according to Penn State College of Medicine (2012), it was deemed a better option for children’s coughs than any available over-the-counter option! Honey soothes on contact and stimulates saliva, which may be the reason it is so effective in coughs and sore throats.

#2 Wounds & Burns. In a 2015 issue of Contemporary Nurse, honey was labeled a better burn treatment than the ordinarily prescribed silver. This is because honey has more antibacterial properties. And, it has no toxic effects on skin.

#3 Arthritis. Manuka honey appears to be useful due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The inflammation experienced in bouts of arthritis is relieved, as is the pain. To experience this benefit, try mixing 2 tablespoons of Manuka honey with 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon in a cup of warm green tea.

#4 Insomnia & Fatigue. Honey has been labeled a super-food. Sleep induction occurs with increased levels of tryptophan and serotonin. Honey includes tryptophan. Honey raises the blood sugar, slightly. That rise in insulin, causes tryptophan to enter the brain where it is converted into serotonin. When dark, serotonin converts to melatonin which aids in sleep. Take two tablespoons of honey each night to aid in alleviating your symptoms of insomnia and fatigue.

#5 Acid Reflux & Heartburn. A mix of apple cider vinegar and honey can help reduce your acid reflux and heartburn troubles. We know it seems counterintuitive, but it is theorized that the cider vinegar and honey mix helps to balance out the pH in the gut. Plus, they are both anti-bacterial agents that can help fight off any bacterial issues that are causing the problems. Try 2 teaspoons each of honey and apple cider vinegar in water or warm tea.

#6 Seasonal Allergies & Asthma. Eating local honey can act like a localized vaccination against those things in the environment that are triggering your allergies. Try to get honey that has been collected near your home so that the same flowers and weeds will have been utilized in its production.

#7 Warts & Acne. Apply honey to warts and cover with a Band-Aid. Repeat the process until the warts disappear. The same is true about acne, although Band-Aids are not necessary. Allow the honey to remain on the problem areas for fifteen minutes and then rinse off. Please make sure that you are using all-natural, raw, unprocessed, preferably organic honey.

#8 Yeast Infections. A piece in Future Microbiology (2014) declared that honey was an effective treatment for yeast infections. If you want to try this out, mix one tablespoon of plain, unsweetened yogurt, with two tablespoons of raw honey. Apply this mixture to the infected area externally and internally. Allow it to remain in place for ten minutes. Wash after application. Consider it a honey douche and look for improvement within a few days, if you use it twice a day as recommended.

#9 Weight Loss & Poor Metabolism. Honey contains 22 amino acids that can aid in boosting metabolism. And, increased metabolism means decreased fat! Consider drinking lemon juice with a little honey each morning to get your metabolism started on the right foot. Honey can potentially fuel the liver and ease stress hormones to aid in weight loss as well.

#10 Helps Prevent Cancer and Heart Disease. Honey includes anti-tumor and carcinogen preventing properties. Honey’s natural anti-oxidant capabilities can help eliminate cancer causing free-radicals and improve the functioning of the immune system.

#11 Energy Booster. Honey naturally provides carbohydrates that provide energy. As such, honey is considered an effective way to improve energy and prevent fatigue. Don’t forget that the glucose in honey is a rapid energy creator and the fructose allows that energy to last. Before you workout, consider taking a spoonful of honey, and if you are feeling drained, spread some on toast or use it in your tea instead of sugar.

#12 Immune System Builder. Recall that honey has anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant properties. These help improve your digestive tract and can aid in the prevention of diseases. If you really want to help your body ward off infectious issues, try drinking a glass of water with lemon and honey each morning. Warm water is recommended here.

#13 Memory Booster. Restful sleep and the reduction of metabolic stress contribute to cognitive and memory functions. Honey offers both. At the University Of Babylon’s College of Medicine, a five year study was conducted that concluded honey had the ability to prevent dementia and cognitive decline.

#14 Face Mask. Honey is terrific for the skin. And, lots of people have been experimenting with its ability to provide a great rejuvenating face mask. Based on your skin type, you’ll have to add either: apple, avocado & egg, or egg, almond oil, and yogurt.

#15 Reduces Ulcers and Other Gastrointestinal Disorders. An ulcer is a lesion in the lining of the stomach. Imbalances in the digestive fluids are generally to blame. Although many are actually caused by h. pylori, a bacteria found in the gut. One tablespoon of raw honey (preferably Manuka) combined with a ¼ teaspoon of ground cinnamon, has been shown to offer considerable relief when taken daily.

#16 Lowers Cholesterol. Cholesterol comes in both good and bad forms. Honey is cholesterol free and is believed to be able to help keep cholesterol levels under control. Taking a honey and cinnamon mix regularly could lower the cholesterol in your blood thanks to its anti-oxidant properties.

#17 Low-libido. Honey is an aphrodisiac. It promotes testosterone in men and aids in estrogen usage in women. In fact, a study showed that three ounces of honey could increase levels of the arousal chemical, nitric oxide. Hippocrates prescribed honey for the purposes of sexual vigor and the induction of ecstasy, all the way back in 500 BC! He recommended that it be used as a sexual stimulant by combining it with pepper and ginger. Definitely something to think about before agreeing to take the little blue pill.

#18 Anxiety. A 2011 study, published in the Journal of Neurophysiology showed that animals that took larger doses of honey demonstrated significant reduction in anxious behaviors and were in better control of their own bodies. The consumption was a one-time deal. This showed that honey can relieve anxiety as quickly as one dose! That’s great news.

#19 Athlete’s Foot. Tinea pedis, or athlete’s foot, is a skin disorder and is caused by a parasitic fungus. You can use propolis (a natural bee product) or honey for treatment of this irritating issue. Rub the foot with honey at night and then cover with an old sock. Wash the dried honey off in the morning. Repeat until the problem has been resolved.

#20 Detoxifying Needs. Lemon and honey water are great detoxification providers. Try drinking a glass of honey and lemon in the morning on an empty stomach. You could also go on a honey water fast if you are really devoted to completing a truly detoxifying procedure

#21 Eczema & Rosacea. A persistent inflammation of the top layer of skin contributes to the symptomology known as eczema. Basically, the immune system is overreacting. There are three potential methods to deal with the issue:

•Apple honey and ground cinnamon applied to effected area
•Warm water mixed with half a lime and a teaspoon of honey ingested every morning for several weeks
•A glass of water combined with a teaspoon of honey and two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar taken three times a day, with meals

#22 Gum Disease. Honey is a great anti-microbial that can effectively treat gum disease even if it sounds counter intuitive to apply sweet stuff to your teeth. Honey can deter the growth of the bacteria that causes dental plague and can ultimately reduce its presence, according to a 2015 study. Manuka honey is the best resource as it has the highest levels of anti-microbials.

#23 Treats Dandruff & Other Scalp Problems. Crude honey is very powerful. The honey needs to be diluted in water and then rubbed into the scalp, specifically focusing on problem areas. Leave it in for three hours and then rinse it out with warm water. Do this every other day for 2 weeks. A study performing the same procedures revealed complete healing and even a decrease in hair loss.

#24 Hangovers. The fructose in honey has been shown to speed up the livers ability to oxidize alcohol. This makes honey a confirmed sobering agent with better results than coffee! Mix 15ml of honey with 70ml of all-natural yogurt and 80ml of orange juice for the best hangover relief you’ve ever tasted.

#25 Stress. Prescription medications are not your only answer for relieving stress. Honey’s nutrients can elicit a calming effect. If you add a decent amount of honey to your breakfast regimen, you might discover that the day’s stress has less of an impact on your emotional well-being.

#26 Workout Fuel. Honey is believed to have the ability to increase athletic performance. In fact, some people use it as an all-natural energy drink. Because there are only 17 grams of carbs in a tablespoon of honey, its fructose and glucose can act as a short-term source of energy.

#27 Regulates Blood Sugar. Although it seems highly unlikely that honey, a sugar, can regulate sugar, it is the balance of fructose and glucose that enables this anomaly to occur. The fructose in the honey sends the glucose straight to the liver where it becomes glycogen. This allows the major organs to function at optimal capacity and keeps the glucose out of the blood, which ultimately lowers blood sugar. Honey produces more liver glycogene than any other food based on per gram studies.

#28 Probiotic. Honey’s therapeutic properties are sometimes viewed as “mysterious.” But, it is the 4 species of Bifidobacterium and 6 species of lactobacilli found in different varieties of honey that contributes to its probiotic capabilities.

#29 Provides Nutrients. Honey includes an array of vitamins and nutrients in small doses. These vitamins and nutrients include: zinc, phosphorous, potassium, manganese, iron, copper, magnesium, riboflavin, calcium, niacin, and pantothenic acid. If you switch your sugars to honey, you will be getting nutrients with your calories!

#30 Potentially Prevents Low White Blood Cell Count. During chemotherapy sessions, 40 percent of patients who took therapeutic honey, at two teaspoons daily, relieved their bouts with low blood cell counts (neutropenia). This study was performed by the Mayo Clinic.

#31 Kills Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Some research performed in doctors’ offices and hospitals has revealed that Honey can kill antibiotic resistant bacteria. Specifically, they found it worked on: Salmonella, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus.

#32 Honey for Herpes. Because Honey has been proven to provide great remedies for wounds, it is no wonder that it can assist in healing the sores associated with Herpes. It takes fluid from the wound and the sugar suppresses the growth of microorganisms. And, low levels of hydrogen peroxide are included in honey. Studies have shown that the topical use of honey is actually more effective than the prescription cream.

#33 Increases Calcium Absorption. When using a calcium supplement, research has shown that ingesting honey can aid in the absorption of the supplemental calcium. In fact, there is a 25% improvement rate when these are taken together. The raffinose, fructose, and glucose found in honey are given the credit for increasing the ability to absorb calcium.

#34 Increase Hemoglobin Count & Treat Anemia. Thanks to the iron, copper, and manganese found in raw dark honey, hemoglobin synthesis can be aided. Keep in mind that the darker the honey is, the better it is for you. Honey will also add that boost you need when dealing with anemia.

#35 Hair Conditioner. If you’ll create a mix of honey and olive oil, you will discover honey’s amazing ability to smooth and condition your hair. Plus, this is an all-natural method!

[source: www.healthymixer.com]

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

How To Make An Emergency Rope Horse Halter




Supplies:
  • 20 feet of 1/4″ or 5/16″ polyester rope 
  • Scissors
  • Matches / Lighter
  • Tape Measurer


1. Start tying simple knots at the following measurement points. Measurements are from knot to knot and do not include the actual knot. Make sure the knot will stay put, but isn’t too tight as you’ll be coming back to slip the rope through them later.


2. Measure 10″ from your Tie Loop. Attach this point to the left nose knot. Then go another 10″ and tie into the right nose knot.


3. In order to do a tie into a knot, you simply loosen the knot and follow the knotted rope around all the turns with the new rope.


4. After the over the nose piece, things get a little complicated. Measure out 30″ more of rope and arrange your ropes in the following pattern so it makes sense. Tie the 30″ into the throat latch knot.


5. Measure 10″ and tie into the right cheek knot.


6. Cut the extra rope to match the length of the poll tie. Then use a match to burn your ends. Most rope halters have the two strings separate. I burnt mine together for convenience.


7. Grab the throat latch and under-nose pieces and tie a knot with a loop hanging from it. This loop is where you’ll attach your lead rope.


8. At this point, you need to try the halter on your horse. The measurements above are all generic horse sized and won’t work perfectly for every horse. Once it’s on your horse, you can determine what lengths need to change.


9. You can see how terribly this fit at this point. I ended up lengthening the over-the-nose- ropes and shortening the throat latch pieces. Much better:



OPTIONAL STEPS:

10. You can add some braiding to the nose-band if you want to. Start with 3′ of rope. Find the middle and slip the rope through one of the nose knots.



11. Loop the added rope behind the original over-the-nose pieces. Then cross them as you bring them through the middle of the original pieces.


12. Repeat the previous step continually until you reach the knot on the other side of the over-the-nose pieces. Slip the added rope through that knot and burn together to hold on place. The nose-band will now look like this:


At this point, your rope halter is finished.


Make sure to tie it correctly when you put it on your horse.


DISCLAIMER: Rope halters can exert a lot more pressure than a normal halter. Do NOT turn a horse out or leave a horse tied with a rope halter. The thinner your rope, the more pressure is exerted.